Emmanuel Macron supports the French 2025 to close 17 nuclear reactors

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France is a world-renowned nuclear power producer, but it is also continuing to move toward the goal of reducing nuclear power. Nicolas Hulot, Minister of Ecological Transformation, said today that it would be possible to close up to 17 nuclear reactors by 2025, equivalent to the current reaction in France 1/3 of the number of stoves.

France has 19 nuclear power plants, 58 reactors, accounting for 75% of the total power generation, the rest from the hydraulic, natural gas, solar energy, wind, etc., many of these reactors will be in the next few years to reach 40 years of use , The French Electric Power Group (EDF) tried to fight for partial service.

Former President Francois Hollande promised to reduce the proportion of nuclear power generation from 75% to 50% by 2025, while increasing the proportion of renewable energy. This commitment has been written in the Energy Transition Act of 2015, and current President Emmanuel Macron agrees to maintain his commitment to a significant reduction.

Emmanuel Macron supports the French 2025 to close 17 nuclear reactors

FILE - This March 17, 2009 file photo shows the cooling towers of Three Mile Island's Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant reflected in a parking lot puddle in Middletown, Pa. A small amount of radiation was detected in a reactor building at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in central Pennsylvania Saturday afternoon, 21, 2009. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Nicolas Hulot said in the RTL radio program that "(government) has made it clear that to reduce the proportion of nuclear power to 50%, everyone should understand that to achieve the goal, you must close a certain number of reactors, not just one, maybe As many as 17, but also to study. "

Nicolas Hulot has announced a series of plan climat, to sell diesel and petrol vehicles by 2040, and no longer use coal to generate electricity targets, but there are many French people think Nicolas Hulot's idea is too utopian.