Samsung released a new chip, the future MacBook Pro optional 4TB SSD solid state hard drive

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The latest MacBook Pro can be the best matching 2TB SSD solid state hard drive. According to iFixit site dismantling, support 2TB SSD because Apple uses two 1TB Samsung V-NAND chip board. Today, Samsung announced that it will launch 1TB V-NAND chip in 2018, which means that next year a V-NAND chip board, you can integrate two 1TB SSD chip, which is 2TB.

Samsung released a new chip, the future MacBook Pro optional 4TB SSD solid state hard drive

Apple MacBook Pro on the current motherboard, front and side are equipped with a Samsung SSD, which means that next year, MacBook Pro will be able to match the highest 4TB SSD. Of course, the current matching 2TB SSD price has been very expensive, the future do not know whether Apple will choose to continue to increase the capacity.

SSDs vs hard drives

Cost per gigabyte is the main stumbling block. You might pay £340 for a 1TB portable SSD, whereas a 1TB external hard drive costs around £50.

That's 34p per gigabyte in SSD land, or 5p with a hard drive.

This is because hard drives use relatively cheap spinning platters to store data. SSDs employ NAND memory chips. They are pricier, but also faster and allow for much smaller enclosures.

If you decide in favour of hard drives, see our roundup of the best Mac hard drives.

SSD performance varies from around 300-500MB/s read speeds all the way up to 3000MB/s, but there are three basic physical forms of SSD. And two can be considered portable.

'Naked' SSD boards plug directly into PCIe or SATA interfaces. These are the kind you might use to replace the SSD in a laptop, or add to a desktop. They are not really portable.

2.5in SSDs offer a mix of portability and internal use, and are the cheapest way to get a portable drive. They have a plastic casing, avoiding damage to the components, but use SATA connectors rather than USB.

You can buy an enclosure to get more protection and that all-important USB or Thunderbolt interface, or even just use a SATA-to-USB cable. We use one of these cables in the office to ferry around test files on a 2.5in SSD.